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How Treatment for Opioids in Long Beach has Changed 

How Treatment for Opioids in Long Beach has Changed 

Opioid addiction in America has risen to crisis proportions in recent years, affecting people from all demographics and all walks of life.

According to a recent study released by the US Department of Health and Human Services, 130 people die every day from opioid overdose from drugs that include prescription pain medications like oxycodone and morphine, synthetic opioids like fentanyl and hydromorphone, and street opiates like heroin.

Opioid addiction can affect anyone

It often starts innocently enough. Following an injury or after surgery, patients are prescribed pain medication to help them cope as they heal. What is supposed to be a temporary intervention quickly turns into a physical addiction.

If the doctor refuses to renew the prescription, patients often turn to the street, often ending up with counterfeit drugs, some laced with deadly doses of fentanyl. Those who do not overdose become even more addicted.

While some manage to maintain their jobs and go on with their lives in spite of it, many lose everything to their addiction, spending all of their time trapped in the cycle of getting money for drugs through crime or deception, looking for drugs, using them, and recovering from them.

For these individuals, there is little choice. The withdrawal symptoms are severe enough that they will do just about anything to keep themselves well – which means, continuing to use. When desperation sets in, any promise of relief will do, leading even the most cautious into dangerous territory.

Opioid addiction treatment Long Beach

While you might think the opioid crisis is a recent phenomenon, addiction has threatened public health several times over the past few centuries. Every time it takes hold, scientists come up with newer versions of the drug that are supposed to be safer.

Many of these formulations, like heroin, and more recently, methadone, have actually been invented to treat addiction. The philosophy is that if a doctor can control and monitor the dosage, it will be easier to manage. In reality, what they are really doing is transferring the addiction to a different form of the same thing and continuing the cycle. While some may respond to this treatment and move past their addiction, many become stuck in it for years, never truly breaking free.

What’s different in today’s opioid treatment?

Today, we better understand the mechanisms of addiction and pain. We approach treatment and recovery differently than in the past, putting the focus on the patient and helping them return to a functional, productive life.

Medications we now use to treat opioid addiction, like buprenorphine, Suboxone, and Subutex, are highly advanced, alleviating the symptoms without causing the opiate “high.”

At our Long Beach opioid treatment center, we combine drug therapy with a multi-disciplinary therapeutic approach that includes psychological counseling, physical therapy, and educational support to help individuals get their lives and their joy for living back on track.

While medications are an important intervention in addiction treatment, we place an equal focus on the underlying cause, whether that is rooted in chronic pain, psychological behaviors, outside stressors, or other forms of mental illness. This type of combination therapy has helped many people overcome the bonds of opioid addiction and return to a healthy, productive, and happy life.

Opioid treatment Long Beach

If you or a loved one is struggling with opioid addiction, we can help. Reach out today to get started.

 

Chronic Pain Podcasts: Top 5 List for 2019

Chronic Pain Podcasts: Top 5 List for 2019

Chronic pain is complicated, and learning about the topic from literature and research can be a daunting task. Chronic pain podcasts are a great way to take in information from a variety of sources and in a format that is fun and entertaining. But there are a lot of chronic pain podcasts out there, so searching for the right one can be as daunting of a task as reading the literature. If you’re searching for the chronic pain podcasts that are right for you, look no further. Michael Aquino, PT, DPT, the Functional Restoration Director for Roots Chronic Pain Recovery put together a list of his favorites. 

 

1. Like Mind, Like Body from Curable

Why we like it: Podcast by the Curable App, an app made and developed by pain scientists and clinicians to treat chronic pain through learning about it and developing the mind body connection. Most patient friendly. You get to hear patient experiences and also get insight from a variety of health professionals.

Where to listen: https://www.curablehealth.com/podcast

2. Pain Reframed from the International Spine & Pain Institute

Why we like it: This one is geared towards health professionals due to the information and topics covered. Really can get health professionals inspired to treat pain better.

Where to listen: https://www.ispinstitute.com/pain-reframed-podcast/

3. The Modern Pain Podcast by Modern Pain Care

Why we like it: Is a good balance for both patient and health professionals. They include patient experiences and professional insight into the treatment of pain.

Where to listen: https://www.modernpaincare.com/modern-pain-podcast/

4. The Healing Pain Podcast with Dr. Joe Tatta

Why we like it: Another great podcast that addresses pain for multiple health professional perspectives and include topics such as nutrition, physical therapy, and mindfulness.

Where to listen: http://www.drjoetatta.com/podcasts/

5. Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast from the PT Podcast Network

Why we like it: Very research heavy and dense. If you’re not a health professional or not into the idea of going over research papers this one may be tough to listen to.

Where to listen: https://ptpodcast.com/podcasts/pain-science-and-sensibility/

Michael Z. Aquino, PT, DPT
Dr. Aquino is an orthopedic and pelvic health physical therapist, who obtained his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Chapman University. Dr. Aquino has a passion for people with chronic pain conditions with a goal of helping them return to function and live meaningful lives again. He underwent clinical mentorship within a multidisciplinary pain program to specialize in chronic pain, working with individuals suffering from chronic pain conditions such as CRPS, chronic low back pain, and chronic neck pain, and chronic pelvic pain. He is currently pursuing his Therapeutic Pain Specialist certification through the International Spine and Pain Institute to further his skill set in modern evidence-based chronic pain treatment.

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For more information or to start admissions – fill out the form below and we’ll reach out to you as soon as possible:

Roots Presents: Nuances in Trauma Treatment with Deborah Sweet, Psy.D.

Roots Presents: Nuances in Trauma Treatment with Deborah Sweet, Psy.D.

Every September, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) sponsors National Recovery Month in an effort to increase awareness and understanding of substance use and mental health disorders, and to honor and celebrate the people who recover. The theme for 2017 is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Strengthen Families and Communities”. One of the most prevalent issues individuals and families face in their journey of recovery is trauma, or the way in which they perceive and experience major life events. As we’ve written in the past, trauma is completely subjective and, if untreated, can lead to the use of behaviors and substances to escape the effects of trauma.

This year, Roots Through Recovery is honored to celebrate Recovery Month with a special speaking event with Deborah Sweet, Psy.D.: “The Nuances of Trauma Treatment: What to use, how and when”. Treating trauma is it’s own specialized area of psychotherapy. Specific tools and modalities are needed to help people recover from the effects of trauma. Trauma is held in the subcortical region of the brain therefore traditional therapy, though wonderful, will not move traumatic incidents the way that EMDR, Brainspotting, Somatic or Havening therapies do. In this talk, Dr. Sweet will provide information on types of treatment and when and how to use them.

Title: “Nuances in Trauma Treatment: What to use, how and when”
Date: Wednesday, September 27th
Time: 11:00am to 1:00pm
Location: 3939 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 102, Long Beach, CA 90807

RSVP NOW to save your seat!

Deborah Sweet, Psy.D. is a licensed psychologist, trauma expert and Founder of the Trauma Counseling Center of Los Angeles. Treatment at TCCLA focuses on helping people recover from the overwhelming effects of trauma using modalities that are specifically designed to help people recover from trauma. These cutting-edge modalities include the Somatic therapies of Somatic Experiencing, Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and the Trauma Resiliency Model; EMDR, Brainspotting and the Havening Technique. At the Trauma Counseling Center of Los Angeles, the team helps individuals clear traumas by engaging the subcortical regions of the brain to restore resiliency to the nervous system, enable clearer thinking and an ability to enjoy life more fully.

Lunch will be provided, thanks to our event sponsor WEconnect Recovery. The event is completely FREE, but you must RSVP, and seats are limited.

This is an officially-registered SAMHSA Recovery Month event. Find more Recovery Month events here.

What is EMDR and How Does it Work?

What is EMDR and How Does it Work?

EMDR has received some notable attention recently thanks to its effectiveness in treating trauma. There is a lot of information available online and in academic literature of the therapy, so we put together this article as an overview of EMDR to help you understand what it is and how it works.


So what exactly is EMDR and how does it work? 

EMDR stands for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, and it involves 8 phases including the use of eye movement, or bilateral stimulation, which appears to be similar to what occurs naturally during dreaming or REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. As we wrote about in past blogs, when a person experiences a traumatic event, their brain goes into defense mode and changes its function.

One of these functions includes the hippocampus, which usually works to store memories in a neat filing system that allows us to easily and accurately recall these memories. When faced with a threat, the hippocampus takes on the role of pumping cortisol throughout the body so that we don’t feel pain, and puts the memory storage on the back burner. So it’s no wonder it’s incredibly difficult to recall a traumatic event, or we recall it inaccurately by filling in the blanks later on.

EMDR allows us to go deep into the brain and file these memories with the appropriate meanings and emotions attached to them. According to the EMDR International Association, the goal of EMDR is to:

“Process completely the experiences that are causing problems, and to include new ones that are needed for full health… That means that what is useful to you from an experience will be learned, and stored with appropriate emotions in your brain, and be able to guide you in positive ways in the future. The inappropriate emotions, beliefs, and body sensations will be discarded… The goal of EMDR therapy is to leave you with the emotions, understanding, and perspectives that will lead to healthy and useful behaviors and interactions.”

One of the leading experts on developmental trauma and author of The Body Keeps the Score, Dr. Bessel van der Kolk recalls the experience he had using EMDR on a patient when he realized the power of the therapy. Watch below:


What are the 8 phases of EMDR?

Phase 1:  The first phase is a history-taking session(s). The therapist assesses the client’s readiness and develops a treatment plan.  Client and therapist identify possible targets for EMDR processing.

Phase 2:  During the second phase of treatment, the therapist ensures that the client has several different ways of handling emotional distress. The therapist may teach the client a variety of imagery and stress reduction techniques the client can use during and between sessions. A goal of EMDR therapy is to produce rapid and effective change while the client maintains equilibrium during and between sessions.

Phases 3-6:  In phases three to six, a target is identified and processed using EMDR therapy procedures.  These involve the client identifying three things:

1.  The vivid visual image related to the memory
2.  A negative belief about self
3.  Related emotions and body sensations.

In addition, the client identifies a positive belief.  The therapist helps the client rate the positive belief as well as the intensity of the negative emotions.  After this, the client is instructed to focus on the image, negative thought, and body sensations while simultaneously engaging in EMDR processing using sets of bilateral stimulation.  These sets may include eye movements, taps, or tones.

Phase 7:  In phase seven, closure, the therapist asks the client to keep a log during the week.  The log should document any related material that may arise.  It serves to remind the client of the self-calming activities that were mastered in phase two.

Phase 8:  The next session begins with phase eight.  Phase eight consists of examining the progress made thus far.  The EMDR treatment processes all related historical events, current incidents that elicit distress, and future events that will require different responses.

From EMDR.com


Does it actually work?

At least 20 positive controlled outcome studies have been done on EMDR therapy. According to the EMDR Institute, which hosts a comprehensive list of EMDR-related research, some of the studies show that 84%-90% of single-trauma victims no longer have post-traumatic stress disorder after only three 90-minute sessions. Another study, funded by the HMO Kaiser Permanente, found that 100% of the single-trauma victims and 77% of multiple trauma victims no longer were diagnosed with PTSD after only six, 50-minute sessions.

EMDR International Association reports on the same topic, “Clients often report improvement in other associated symptoms such as anxiety. The current treatment guidelines of the American Psychiatric Association and the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies designate EMDR as an effective treatment for post traumatic stress. EMDR was also found effective by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense, the United Kingdom Department of Health, the Israeli National Council for Mental Health, and many other international health and governmental agencies. Research has also shown that EMDR can be an efficient and rapid treatment” (www.emdria.org).


Who does EMDR? 

Only Masters-level or Doctoral-level professionals–therapists, nurses and doctors–who have gone through approved EMDR training can provide EMDR to people. Roots Through Recovery is proud to have two clinicians on our team that are trained and certified to provide EMDR. Clients who have undergone EMDR therapy for trauma have seen great improvement in their management of traumatic experiences, and how that plays a role in their addictions and mental health.

For a free assessment or to find out more, call us today at (562) 473-0827 or email us at info@roots-recovery.com


Related Articles from Roots:

The Direct Link Between Trauma and Addiction

How Childhood Trauma affects health across a lifetime

Resources & Further Reading:

EMDR International Association

EMDR Institute, Inc.

Dr. Bessel van der Kolk

Roots Through Recovery Announces the Start of its Evening IOP Program

Roots Through Recovery Announces the Start of its Evening IOP Program

Roots Through Recovery opened its doors in January 2017 and in the last four months, the program has grown to include daytime partial hospitalization and morning intensive outpatient to meet the various needs of our clients. There has been a lot of interest in recent weeks for an evening intensive outpatient program for the working professionals in Long Beach and the South Bay.

In response to this growing need, Roots Through Recovery is excited to announce the start of its evening IOP program beginning the week of May 15th!


CALL NOW (562) 473-0827


Much like our daytime programs, the evening IOP program will focus on addressing underlying trauma and mental health needs of community members who are coping with alcohol or drug addiction. Our compassionate and highly trained therapists provide trauma-informed care in small groups and individual therapy.

Group Room 2

Contact us today to find out about our promotional cash pay rate! Call Josh at 562-473-0827, chat with us or verify your insurance right now.